New Book Release

Judith Kolberg is pleased to announce the forthcoming book:

Emotional Labor: Why A Woman’s Work is Never Done and What to do About it.

Emotional labor is the unnoticed, unwaged, unwritten work women do in the home and in the paid workforce. It includes everything from assuring socks match to coping with a virus, schooling, a job and family life all under one roof. Largely invisible, the mental load of emotional labor weighs heavily on the shoulders of women. Dr. Regina Lark, the author of Emotional Labor: Why A Woman’s Work is Never Done and What to Do About It is a feminist historian with years of professional organizing experience in homes, offices and storage spaces.  This book examines women’s relationship to emotional labor from early American history to the COVID-19 era. Emotional labor is generally thought to be women’s work, whether at home or in the office, but it is actually not gender specific. It’s just, well, work!

Emotional Labor cover_back-cover.jpg
COVER w_CPO 5.24.21.jpg

Judith Kolberg, a thought-leader in the organizing industry, collaborates with Lark to disrupt the narrative. Lark and Kolberg give emotional labor the respect it deserves as work that is essential to a well-functioning home, family coherence, order, organization and happiness. Emotional Labor: Why A Woman’s Work is Never Done and What to Do About It advocates for a more equitable sharing of emotional labor. The book offers tools and exercises to promote equity including on-going dynamic dialogues, a brand of delegating that directly eases emotional labor, and a ground-breaking reference tool called The Emotional Labor Lifecycle. It also calls for support of social action that addresses women’s rights and equality.

amazon-button.png
Picture1.png

In their new book, Lark and Kolberg, two outstanding organizers/feminists who have helped revolutionize the world of women with chronic and severe organizational challenges, now expand our perspective to help us see beyond women with executive function difficulties. They shine a light on how most women carry an enormous burden as a result of the mental gymnastics involved in tracking the needs of each family member in order to prevent both minor inconveniences and larger disasters.  ~ Sari Solden, M.S. A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD